What is Acanthamoeba?

Acanthamoeba is a microorganism that can cause an infection of the eye. The organism is commonly found in water sources used to clean contact lenses.

What are the Symptoms of an Acanthamoeba Infection?

Tearing and the sensation of something in your eye.

Light sensitivity

Blurred vision

Red, painful, irritated eyes

How Common is Acanthamoeba?

Acanthamoeba infections are fairly rare, but their incidence increases with improper contact lens hygiene.

What are the Risk Factors for an Acanthamoeba Infection?

Using tap water to clean contact lenses

Swimming in any water source with your contact lenses in your eyes

Poor contact lens hygiene

How is Acanthamoeba Diagnosed?

Diagnosing an acanthamoeba infection begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith

During this exam, your doctor uses equipment such as a slit-lamp to properly identify the acanthamoeba microorganism

How can You Avoid Acanthamoeba?

Properly care for your contact lenses!

Remember to always wash your hands before touching your contact lenses or your eyes

Never use anyone else’s contact lenses

Never swim in or sleep in your contact lenses

Use proper contact lens solution prescribed by your doctor

See your doctor every year so that they can evaluate your contact lenses to determine if any change in lens is needed

What is Anterior Uveitis?

Anterior uveitis is the medical term used to refer to an inflammation in the middle layer of the eye

Inflammation includes the iris and surrounding tissue

What are the Symptoms of Anterior Uveitis?

Red, sore and inflamed eye

Blurred vision

Light sensitivity

Small pupil

What Causes Anterior Uveitis?

Anterior uveitis can occur following an injury to the eye

It can also be associated with other systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, rubella or mumps

Other eye diseases can also lead to anterior uveitis

How is Anterior Uveitis Diagnosed?

Diagnosing anterior uveitis begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith

During this exam, your doctor uses equipment such as a slit-lamp to properly identify the uveitis

Your doctor may use other tests to assist in pinpointing the source of the uveitis

How is Anterior Uveitis Treated?

Prescription Eye Drops

Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

What is Blepharitis?

Blepharitis is the medical term for inflammation of the eyelids

Blepharitis can either be anterior (on the outside front edge of the eyelids) or posterior (on the inner edge of the eyelids)

What are the Symptoms of Blepharitis?

Burning sensation in the eyes/Gritty feeling in eyes

Tearing Itchy, red, swollen eyelids

Dry eyes Crusting eyelids or “dandruff” on the eyelids

In severe cases, blepharitis can lead to blurred vision, loss of eyelashes and inflammation in other parts of the eye

What Causes Blepharitis?

Blepharitis can be caused by hormones, nutrition, and infectious agents In anterior blepharitis, the main cause is either a bacterial infection or dandruff of the scalp area

It can also be caused by allergies In posterior blepharitis, the main cause is usually irregular oil production by the eyelid glands

This leads to bacterial growth

Acne and rosacea can also cause this type of blepharitis

When does Blepharitis Occur?

Blepharitis affects people of all ages

How is Blepharitis Diagnosed?

Diagnosing blepharitis begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith

During this exam, your doctor uses multiple tests to evaluate the eyelids and tears

How is Blepharitis Treated?

Treatment usually depends upon the type of blepharitis, but the key to treating most blepharitis is keeping the eyelids clean

This includes: Warm Compresses

Eyelids Massage

Artificial Tears

Anti-Dandruff Shampoo

Treatment may also warrant the discontinuation of use of contact lenses or the wearing of makeup until the blepharitis is resolved

What is a Cataract?

A cataract is a clouding or opacity in the lens of the eye

Depending upon the size of the cataract, it can diminish normal vision

The clouding process is a result of changes in the proteins and lens fibers in the eye

What are the Symptoms of Cataracts?

Cataracts usually form rather slowly, so the symptoms my slowly progress over time

Blurred or hazy vision

Reduced color vision

Increased difficulty seeing at night

Change in prescription

Increased complaints of glare when driving at night

How Common are Cataracts?

Cataracts are very common as you age and cataract surgery is the most commonly performed surgical procedure performed in the world!

What Causes Cataracts?

Most cataracts form as a result of age and time

Other possible causes of cataracts include diabetes, certain medications, UV radiation, smoking, alcohol and nutritional deficiency

Some infants or young children can develop cataracts, but this is very rare

The cause is usually genetics or infection during pregnancy

When do Cataracts Occur?

Most cataracts develop in people over the age of 55

Occasionally they occur in very young children

How are Cataracts Diagnosed?

Diagnosing cataracts begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith

During this exam, your doctor uses multiple tests to evaluate the presence of a cataract

This may include evaluation of the lens and other supplemental testing

How are Cataracts Treated?

There are some approaches to try and prevent cataract formation.

This includes: Wearing sunglasses

Discontinuing smoking

Increasing the intake of antioxidant vitamins in the diet

Eating lots of leafy green vegetables

Treating cataracts depends on the severity and progression of the cataract. Cataract surgery is the most common treatment and it is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the world! Cataract Resources National Institute of Health: http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/cataract/cataract_facts.asp

What is a Chalazion?

A chalazion is the medical term used to describe a lump that slowly develops on the eyelid

Chalazion are often confused with a stye because they both appear as bumps on the eyelids

Styes produce a red, painful, swollen bump on the eyelid

What are the Symptoms of a Chalazion?

Initially, a red, tender swollen eyelid

Eventually, a painless, slow growing bump on the eyelid

Tearing

Blurred vision if the chalazion is large enough

How Common are Chalazion?

Chalazion are more common in adults

People ages 30 to 50 most frequently develop chalazion

Chalazion are more common on the upper eyelids

What Causes a Chalazion?

A chalazion is caused by a swelling or blockage of an oil gland in the eyelid

Chalazion are usually not the result of an infection

When does a Chalazion Occur?

Some risk factors for chalazion include acne, seborrhea, tuberculosis, viral infections and chronic blepharitis

How is a Chalazion Diagnosed?

Diagnosing chalazion begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith

During this exam, your doctor uses multiple tests to evaluate the presence of a chalazion

How is a Chalazion Treated?

Some chalazion may resolve over time without treatment, however, they often recur

Warm Compresses, Gentle Massaging

If the chalazion do not resolve on their own, intervention by your doctor may be necessary

What is Conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is the medical term for infection or inflammation of the thin, transparent layer that lines the inside of the eyelids and the white portion of the eye. “Pink eye” is another common term used to refer to conjunctivitis.

What are the Symptoms of Conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis may occur in one or both eyes

Gritty feeling in eyes

Itching/Burning sensation

Excessive tearing

Discharge and swollen eyelids

Pink color in the whites of the eyes

How Common is Conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is especially common in children

The best way to prevent most conjunctivitis is to practice good hygiene in ways such as washing your hands regularly and avoiding touching your eyes with your hands

What Causes Conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis can be caused by either bacterial or viral infections

It can also be caused by an allergic reaction to sources such as smoke, cosmetics or chlorine

Conjunctivitis can also be caused by sexually transmitted diseases

How is Conjunctivitis Diagnosed?

Diagnosing conjunctivitis begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to focus on the conjunctiva and surrounding tissues to verify the presence of a conjunctivitis

How is Conjunctivitis Treated?

There are three main goals in the treatment of a conjunctivitis:

Increase your comfort level

Reduce the course of the infection/inflammation

Prevent spread of infection

It is important for individuals who wear contact lenses to discontinue using their lenses during the course of the conjunctivitis to prevent recurrence Conjunctivitis

Resources:

Kids Health: http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/eye/conjunctivitis.html

What is a Corneal Abrasion?

A corneal abrasion is the medical term for a scratch on the front surface of the eye.

What are the Symptoms of a Corneal Abrasion?

Eye pain

Feeling of sand in your eye

Tearing

Blurred vision

Increased light sensitivity

Redness

Headaches

How Common is a Corneal Abrasion?

Corneal abrasions are very common, especially in situations where dust or particles are present.

What Causes a Corneal Abrasion?

A corneal abrasion can be caused by anything that scratches the eye. Some examples include paper, dirt, dust and sand.

How is a Corneal Abrasion Diagnosed?

Diagnosing a corneal abrasion begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to focus on the corneal surface to detect the severity and depth of the abrasion.

How is a Corneal Abrasion Treated?

Corneal abrasions are usually treated with time. Like any wound, the cornea needs time to heal. Your eye doctor may also prescribe you eye drops or ointments to aid in the healing process and to protect the eye from infection

What is Diabetic Retinopathy?

Diabetic retinopathy is a medical term used to describe progressive damage to the retina in a person who is diabetic. Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness in the United States.

What are the Symptoms of Diabetic Retinopathy?

Initially, there are very few symptoms associated with early diabetic retinopathy

Blurry vision

Dark/Empty spot in the center of view

Spots/Floaters in your view

Difficulty seeing at night

How Common is Diabetic Retinopathy?

Diabetic retinopathy is common in the United States. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely they are to develop diabetic retinopathy.

Some risk factors for diabetic retinopathy include:

Diabetes

Hispanic and African Americans

High blood pressure, cholesterol, etc.

Pregnancy

What Causes Diabetic Retinopathy?

Diabetes is a disease that results in too much sugar being in the blood. This excess sugar can lead to damage throughout the body, including the eyes. Diabetic retinopathy is the result of damage to the small blood vessels that provide nutrition to the retina. The vessels begin to leak fluids, which leads to swelling and blurry vision. New blood vessels can also begin to grow in an attempt to improve circulation, which can further damage vision.

When does Diabetic Retinopathy Occur?

Diabetic retinopathy can occur at any point in a person who has diabetes. Better blood sugar control can delay the onset and severity.

How is Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosed?

Diagnosing diabetic retinopathy begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate the appearance and health of your retina.

In additional to your exam, your doctor may use technology such as retinal photography or fluorescein angiography to better evaluate your retina for problems. It is crucial that people with diabetes receive a comprehensive eye exam annually. Early detection is critical for the possibility of prevent vision loss.

How is Diabetic Retinopathy Treated?

Diabetic retinopathy is treated based on severity.

Some examples of treatment include:

Laser surgery to seal leaky blood vessels

Injections of medications into the eye to decrease inflammation

The best way to prevent diabetic retinopathy is to continually manage your diabetes.

Take prescribed medication

Stick to a diabetic diet

Exercise regularly

Control blood pressure and avoid smoking

See your eye doctor annually for a comprehensive eye exam

Diabetic Retinopathy Resources

National Institute of Health: http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/diabetic/retinopathy.asp

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

Nearly 10 million Americans suffer from dry eye syndrome. Dry eye is a term used to describe a condition where there are not enough tears to adequately nourish or lubricate the eye. The tears provide for clear vision, nourish the eye and protect the eye from infection and particles.

What are the Symptoms of Dry Eye?

Gritty/Scratchy eyes

Burning eyes

Excess watering

Blurry vision

Irritated eyes or the feeling of something in your eyes

How Common is Dry Eye?

Dry eye is a very common condition in the United States. It is particularly common in older adults. The most common form of dry eye is due to an inadequate amount of water in the tears. This condition is referred to as dry eye syndrome and is very common.

What Causes Dry Eye?

Inadequate tear production and poor tear quality are frequent Dry Eye Causes.

There are several factors putting people more at risk for dry eye:

Being over age 65

Females

People taking certain medications for things such as blood pressure

Medical conditions such as arthritis

Living and work environments exposing individuals to things like smoke or wind

Working on computers for long periods of time

Long-term contact lens use

When does Dry Eye Occur?

Dry eye can occur at any time during life. It is more common the older that a person gets.

How is Dry Eye Diagnosed?

Diagnosing dry eye begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your tear film layer and the health of your eyelids and glands.

How is Dry Eye Treated?

Adding Tears

Blocking the Tear Ducts to Preserve Tears

Prescription Eye Drops

Nutritional Supplements Containing Fatty Acids

Decreasing Inflammation if Present

There are also steps you can take to reduce dry eye symptoms such as wearing sunglasses, staying hydrated and remembering to blink regularly when at work

What is Poor Eye Coordination?

Eye coordination is the ability of your eyes to work together to bring two separate images together into one by a process called fusion. Your brain converts the two images into a 3-D image. Proper eye coordination gives your eyes the ability to perform this task. Eye coordination is developed over time starting when you are bornWhen your eyes do not develop proper coordination a host of problems can follow.

What are the Symptoms of Poor Eye Coordination?

Headaches

Double vision

Eye/Body fatigue

Dizziness

Difficulty reading

Children display other unique characteristics of poor eye coordination including losing their place when reading, poor sports performance and avoiding near tasks

How is Poor Eye Coordination Diagnosed?

Diagnosing poor eye coordination begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your eye coordination. Regular comprehensive eye exams for children and teenagers are essential for monitoring proper eye coordination development.

How is Poor Eye Coordination Treated?

Glasses or Contact Lenses

Vision Therapy

What is Glaucoma?

 

Glaucoma is the medical term used to refer to an eye disorder that leads to optic nerve damage. Glaucoma is characterized by progressive loss of vision. The optic nerve is a bundle of over a million nerves which transmit vision to the brain for interpretation. In glaucoma, these nerve fibers become damaged or die.

What are the Symptoms of Glaucoma?

Initially peripheral vision loss. It can advance to central vision loss.

How Common is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the United States. Some other risk factors for glaucoma include thin corneas, medications that increase eye pressure and chronic eye inflammation.

What Causes Glaucoma?

The exact cause of glaucoma is still unknown. The disease is usually associated with an increase in the pressure of the fluid inside the eye. However, some individuals with glaucoma have normal eye pressures.

When does Glaucoma Occur?

Glaucoma occurs most often in people over the age of 40 and in people with a family history of glaucoma.

How is Glaucoma Diagnosed?

Diagnosing glaucoma begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your eye more thoroughly including tests to measure the pressure inside of your eye. Additional testing allowing your eye doctor to examine the nerve fiber layers in your eye can assist in monitoring the progression of glaucoma.

How is Glaucoma Treated?

Medications: These medications are intended to keep eye pressure under control and are prescribed for life

Surgery:

Laser Surgery or Drainage

Implants

Glaucoma Research Foundation: http://www.glaucoma.org/index.php

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus is a medical term used to describe a disorder in which the cornea of the eye is thin and cone-shaped instead of round. The cone-shape of the cornea prevents light from focusing properly on the retina leading to distorted vision.

What are the Symptoms of Keratoconus?

Slight blurry vision

Sensitivity to light/Glare

As the disease progresses through life, the cornea can swell and eventually crack. This cracking may heal and form scar tissue on the cornea making normal vision impossible.

How Common is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus is fairly uncommon

When does Keratoconus Occur?

Keratoconus usually begins the late teens or late 20s. The disease usually progresses for the next 10-20 years and then slows down.

How is Keratoconus Diagnosed?

Diagnosing keratoconus begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your vision and the front surface of your cornea. Your eye doctor may frequently use a corneal topographer to map the changing topography of your cornea. Keratoconus requires frequent exams by your eye doctor to monitor progression.

How is Keratoconus Treated?

Glasses

Soft Contact Lenses

Rigid Gas Permeable Contact Lenses

Corneal Transplant

What is ARMD?

ARMD is the medical term used to describe changes in the macula of the retina. The macula is a small portion of retina that is responsible for central vision. Once this vision is lost, it can not be restored. ARMD can either be “dry” or “wet” depending on its progression.

What are the Symptoms of ARMD?

Dark/Empty area in central vision

Gradual loss of vision/Distorted vision

Loss of color vision

How Common is ARMD?

ARMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss in adults over 50. It is estimated that 1.8 million Americans have ARMD. Another 7.3 million Americans are considered at risk for ARMD development. Caucasians and women are at a higher risk for ARMD development.

What Causes ARMD?

Dry ARMD is caused when the tissue of the macula thins and stops functioning properly. Wet ARMD is caused when new vessels that grow under the macula begin to leak and damage vision. This damage can often times be very rapid.

How is ARMD Diagnosed?

Diagnosing ARMD begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your vision and the health of your retina. ARMD requires frequent exams by your eye doctor to monitor progression.

How is ARMD Treated?

There is no cure for the dry form of ARMD. There is a link between nutrition and the health of the macula. Eating lots of leafy-green vegetables and low-fat foods can boost macular health. Nutritional supplements may also aide in a healthy macula. Wet ARMD can be treated with a laser or medications. The laser seals off the leaky blood vessels that lead to vision loss.

Macular Degeneration Resources:

Macular Degeneration Network: http://www.macular-degeneration.org

What is Nystagmus?


Nystagmus is the medical term used to describe a condition in which the eyes make uncontrolled movements. This movement can often times hinder normal vision. The eye movements can occur in a number of directions and patterns.

What are the Symptoms of Nystagmus?

Reduced vision

Reduced depth perception

Poor balance/coordination

Head tilt

What Causes Nystagmus?

Nystagmus is due to an impairment of the system controlling eye movements.

It can also be caused by a number of factors such as:

Very high refractive error

Congenital Cataracts

Inner ear inflammation

Medications

Stress and fatigue can activate nystagmus

When does Nystagmus Occur?

Nystagmus is usually the result of some other underlying condition. Nystagmus can be inherited and appear in childhood. It can also occur later in life as the result of an event such as an injury, stroke or multiple sclerosis.

How is Nystagmus Diagnosed?

Diagnosing nystagmus begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your vision and your eye muscle coordination system.

How is Nystagmus Treated?

There is no cure for Nystagmus. Prisms and special glasses can help aid those with nystagmus. Surgery is another option available for those with large head tilts.

What is Ocular Hypertension?

Ocular hypertension is a medical term used to describe an increase in the pressure of the eye without any visible damage or vision changes. Ocular hypertension is not the same as glaucoma as glaucoma patients have visual changes and optic nerve damage. Not all people with ocular hypertension develop glaucoma. Ocular hypertension patients are at an increased risk of glaucoma, making regular examinations by your eye doctor critical.

What are the Symptoms of Ocular Hypertension?

There are no noticeable signs or symptoms of ocular hypertension.

How Common is Ocular Hypertension?

Ocular hypertension is more common in African Americans and people over the age of 40. It is also more common in those with a family history of ocular hypertension and/or glaucoma and in those with diabetes.

When does Ocular Hypertension Occur?

Ocular hypertension occurs when the pressure of the fluid in the eye becomes elevated above normal without damaging the optic nerve or affecting vision.

How is Ocular Hypertension Diagnosed?

Diagnosing ocular hypertension begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your vision and the pressure inside of your eyes. Your doctor may use additional testing and technology to monitor the health and changes in your retina and optic nerve.

How is Ocular Hypertension Treated?

There is no cure for ocular hypertension. Monitoring and treating ocular hypertension when necessary can help decrease the risk of damage to your eyes.

What is Retinitis Pigmentosa?

Retinitis pigmentosa is the medical term used to describe a group of diseases that damage the rods and cones that make up the retina of the eye. Rods tend to be affected more by retinitis pigmentosa than cones. The rods are responsible more for peripheral vision.

What are the Symptoms of Retinitis Pigmentosa?

Night blindness

Loss of peripheral vision

Bumping into furniture

What Causes Retinitis Pigmentosa?

Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetic disease.

When does Retinitis Pigmentosa Occur?

Retinitis pigmentosa usually begins to develop during childhood or early teenage years. The disease generally takes a long time to progress, so the loss of vision is usually gradual.

How is Retinitis Pigmentosa Diagnosed?

Diagnosing retinitis pigmentosa begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your vision and the function of your retina.

How is Retinitis Pigmentosa Treated?

There is no cure currently for retinitis pigmentosa. Nutrition appears to be key to slowing progression

What is Retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma is the medical term for the most common form of childhood cancer in the eye.

How Common is Retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma occurs in 1 in every 20,000 children born in the United States. It is the tenth most common pediatric cancer.

What Causes Retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma can either be inherited or occur sporadically. Anyone with a family history of retinoblastoma should be assessed by an eye doctor.

When does Retinoblastoma Occur?

Retinoblastoma occurs in infancy.

How is Retinoblastoma Diagnosed?

Diagnosing retinoblastoma begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

Once diagnosed, an eye doctor will refer a child to a pediatric specialist for treatment.

How is Retinoblastoma Treated?

Surgery to remove the retinoblastoma

What is Strabismus?

Strabismus is the medical term used to describe the condition where both eyes do not look at the same place at the same time. It is also referred to as crossed eyes. The eye may turn in, out, up or down depending on the muscle(s) responsible for the strabismus. The turned eye may be present all of the time or it may only appear when a person becomes fatigued or stressed.

What are the Symptoms of Strabismus?

Double vision is a primary symptom. Strabismus may become worse without treatment. Eventually, the brain may cut off nerve signals to one of the eyes leading to a permanent condition known as amblyopia.

How Common is Strabismus?

People with a family history of strabismus, large refractive errors or those with medical conditions such as Down syndrome are at a higher risk for strabismus.

What Causes Strabismus?

Strabismus is usually the result of poor eye muscle control or large amounts of farsightedness. It can also develop as a result of injuries to the eyes.

When does Strabismus Occur?

Strabismus usually develops in children usually by age 3. Older children and adults can also develop strabismus.

How is Strabismus Diagnosed?

Diagnosing strabismus begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate the alignment of your eyes and overall eye muscle ranges.

How is Strabismus Treated?

Eyeglasses

Contact Lenses

Vision Therapy

Eye Muscle Surgery

What is Retinal Destachment?

A retinal detachment occurs when the retinal layer of the eye separates from the back wall of the eye

What are the Symptoms of a Retinal Detachment?

Sudden vision defects

Blind spots

Shadows in vision

Floaters

Flashes of light

What Causes a Retinal Detachment?

Retinal detachments can be caused by eye injuries, tumors or eye surgeries. Very nearsighted people and the elderly are at a greater risk for retinal detachments. Diabetic patients are also at an increased risk for retinal detachments due to associated bleeding.

How is a Retinal Detachment Diagnosed?

Diagnosing a retinal detachment begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

Retinal Detachment Resources

Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/retinal-detachment/DS00254

What are Eye Allergies?

Eye allergies are the result of allergic reactions affecting the eye region. Eye allergies can also trigger other problems such as asthma.

What are the Symptoms of Eye Allergies?

Red/Swollen eyes

Itchy eyes

Runny nose

Headaches

Sneezing/Coughing

How Common are Eye Allergies?

Eye allergies are very common. 30 – 50% of Americans suffer from allergy symptoms and 75% of those symptoms affect the eyes.

What Causes Eye Allergies?

Most eye allergies are inherited. An allergic reaction usually occurs when you are exposed to something your body views as harmful, even if it is not. Examples of allergens include smoke, cosmetics and pollen.

How are Eye Allergies Diagnosed?

Diagnosing eye allergies begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate any allergic reactions taking place in your eyes and talks with you to try and pinpoint the source.

How are Eye Allergies Treated?

Avoidance of any triggering allergens

Prescription Medications

Eye Drops

What is a Subconjunctival Hemorrhage?

A subconjunctival hemorrhage is the medical term used to describe a break in the blood vessels beneath the conjunctiva of the eye. Anytime you see visible blood in your eye, seek medical treatment from your eye doctor immediately.

What are the Symptoms of a Subconjunctival Hemorrhage?

Red, bloody appearing eye.

How Common are Subconjuntival Hemorrhages?

Subconjunctival hemorrhages are fairly common, especially in people who participate in activities that result in blows to the eye such as boxing.

What Causes Subconjunctival Hemorrhages?

Eye trauma

Heavy lifting, coughing, sneezing or laughing

Constipation

Blood thinner medications

Vitamin K deficiency

How is a Subconjunctival Hemorrhage Diagnosed?

Diagnosing a subconjunctival hemorrhage begins with a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Smith.

During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your conjunctiva to determine the extent of the hemorrhage and to asses if it is causing any decrease in vision.

How is a Subconjunctival Hemorrhage Treated?

Artificial tears to soothe the eye. Rest and time: like most cuts and bruises, it can take around 10 days for a subconjunctival hemorrhage to dissipate.

What are Spots and Floaters?

Spots and floaters are small specks or particles within the vitreous of the eye. They generally move as you move your eyes.

What are the Symptoms of Spots and Floaters?

They may appear in various shapes and sizes, threadlike strands or cobwebs.

How Common are Spots and Floaters?

Spots and floaters are very common and are mostly harmless. Spots can sometimes be an indication of certain eye diseases. If you are unsure, it is a good idea to have your eye doctor examine your eyes to be sure the spots you see are not related to a more serious problem.

What Causes Spots and Floaters?

Generally, spots and floaters are caused by clumps of protein or other material trapped in the vitreous of your eye at birth. Spots and floaters can also form as a result of deterioration of the vitreous from age or injury.